Law Office of Barbara J. Dibble
Call Us Today 714-515-5126
Menu Contact

Estate Planning Archives

Divorce means it's time to update your estate plan

When you decide to get divorced, it means that much of the estate plan you created with your former spouse no longer applies. Some things may still work -- leaving assets to your children, for instance -- but it is time to take a look at all of the documents and make sure they have been properly updated to reflect the fact that you are now single.

Tips for adding an art collection into your estate plan

If you are an art collector, odds are that your collection is one of the most valuable things that you own. Not only does it have a lot of sentimental value, but you have invested time and money into it. It could be worth more than your home. You absolutely need to make sure that you work it into your estate plan, along with your other assets.

Quick facts about Alzheimer's you should know

The unfortunate reality is that Alzheimer's is a serious issue for many elderly people who have to do their estate planning. Even years before they pass away, the disease can really take hold and cause their mental state to deteriorate. This matters for estate planning purposes because a person needs to have the mental capacity to make an estate plan to guarantee it will hold up in court.

There's a special trust if you're cryonically frozen

Do you think that being cryonically frozen sounds like something out of a science fiction movie? While it does feature prominently in such forms, it is also a very real procedure. You can have your body frozen when you pass away, with the idea that you can then be reincarnated at some later date.

Do you need to set up a will reading?

As you do your estate planning, you draft a will that leaves your assets to your heirs. Most of the money gets split up evenly, but you do set aside specific sentimental assets for certain individuals. You know how important it is for them to know exactly what you wanted them to have.

How can I use a trust to bypass probate proceedings for my heirs?

It's understandable that you would want to prevent your heirs from needing to go through probate. Probate proceedings can be expensive and lengthy. They're also public, so anyone can find out information about you and your family.However, with the strategic use of a trust, you can avoid the need for costly and time-consuming probate proceedings. A trust -- for example, a living trust -- offers both confidentiality and the ability to give your assets directly to heirs. You can also structure and plan the way your assets are given -- either over time at specific intervals or immediately upon your death.

Have you considered a revocable trust for your estate plan?

A revocable trust is an important estate planning tool. These trusts are set up while the trust maker, a.k.a., the grantor, is still alive. After formalizing the trust within a legal document, the grantor will transfer assets to the ownership of the trust and becomes the initial "trustee" who administers and manages the trust.

Are you considering a pet trust? Read this first

California pet lovers who want to create a responsible plan for their animals may want to consider the creation of a pet trust. This can be an excellent way to ensure that your animal is cared for long after you're gone, or in the event that you become medically incapacitated and are no longer able to tend to your pet's needs without assistance.

Estate planning for unmarried couples

In today's social climate, it much more common for couples to live together for long stretches of time before deciding whether to marry. Some choose to remain together and unmarried indefinitely. While this may not cause too many complications while both parties are still living, if one party dies or becomes incapacitated, then the other party may not receive any of their possessions from their estate. Typically, when a legally single person dies, their property passes on to direct relatives, depending on the intestacy laws that their state of residence uses.

Email Us For A Response

Schedule a consultation with an attorney

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Office Location:
1235 N. Harbor Boulevard
Suite 200
Fullerton, CA 92832

Phone: 714-515-5126
Fax: 714-871-5620
Map & Directions

Phone Numbers: