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June 2017 Archives

Beware outdated beneficiary designations

If you have not updated your will in some time, you should consider revisiting its terms and beneficiaries. Of course, changing your beneficiaries is not always as simple as simply updating your will. In California, if you name your spouse as a beneficiary, then you face some legal hurdles before you can remove him or her as a beneficiary or add additional beneficiaries in case he or she passes away before you do.

Be sure to protect your digital assets in your estate plan

Estate planning is a complex process, and the best laid plans can prove very difficult to implement if you do not take special care to leave your executor the tool he or she needs to abide by your instructions. These days, many assets are solely or primarily digital assets, so it is important that you make appropriate provisions to ensure that your digital assets are included in your estate plan, as well as ensuring that your executor has authority and the proper information needed to access your digital assets.

Tax implications of adding a guest house

For many Californian's, their home is an essential component of their estate plan. However, maintaining an effective estate plan becomes more complicated the more changes occur to to the assets within an estate, and modifications or additions to your home may change how you approach this asset and its tax implications.

Wills have limitations to their power

It is common knowledge that nearly every adult should have some sort of proper will. Wills help you make your end-of-life wishes known and can protect your family from a lengthy mess that drains away resources and helps property pass from from one individual to another efficiently. However, there are some things you should not attempt to use a will to do.

Can I challenge a will?

If you recently faced the loss of a close relative or loved one, you most likely had to deal with a will. Very often, one party or another believes that a will is invalid, and wonders if it is possible to challenge the terms of the will.

Does moving states affect my trust?

Often, as people grow older and pursue opportunities and interests, they move from one state to another. Of course, any time you move states, you suddenly must contend with a whole host of issues you might not expect — different taxation and different laws that govern everything from DUI penalties to building codes. But, does moving states affect your estate planning if you created a trust in one state and relocate to another?

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